February 06, 2010

ever upward







well, enough time has passed (year and a half), so here's the story i did for Popgun 3, in its entirety. documentary near-haiku comics! hopefully there'll be a chance to do more of these soon.

22 comments:

zanzan said...

sweet, cheers man!

Marko said...

Mali dargulj.

andreas schuster said...

hei,
I was pretty sick on Wednesday and spent the day in bed reading stuff.
Your blog was one of those things and I wanted to say THX!
I had a good time and I really like your drawings!

Sean Phillips said...

Really beautiful stuff Tonci. Elegantly told, lovely drawings, nice subtle colours.

Dillon said...

I love this, it's excellent. Clear and beautiful. Nice one.

Evan "Doc" Shaner said...

This is gorgeous, Tonci. I love space travel stories, and the storytelling here is fantastic. Great color palette.

tonci said...

thank you all for the really nice words- didn't expect such a response. =) will try to make more soon!

-t

miljenko said...

I love the look and feel of this comic, it kind of reminds me of b-52 cockpit scenes in Dr. Strangelove. :)

Greg said...

That was awesome. I loved page 4. Really cool layouts all around.

Daniel.Z said...

Wow, this is fantastic.
Beautiful drawn and well paced.

Francisco Galárraga said...

EXCELENT!!!

helti said...

jako dobro :)

mario said...

ma , odlično :)

Anonymous said...

Beautiful comic. Unfortunately, Kittinger never broke the speed of sound, his peak speed being 614 mph (the speed of sound being 761 mph). That he did so is less urban legend than simple misinformation. Doesn't detract from your gorgeous artwork, panelling or lettering, but Kittinger ain't a guy who would want people thinking he did something he didn't.

JuanCarlos said...

Simple and beautiful imagery!

noir62 said...

Wonderful Alex Toth homage!

Scott Morse said...

You're absolutely fantastic.

Christopher Soprano said...

Well written an beautifully drawn; especially page 5.

Richard Naviasky said...

Love the flow...

Booda said...

This is great. I had the pleasure to chat with Col. Joe in a Czech pub a couple of years ago. A real hero, truly courageous and deserves to be recognised as the first man in space and to hell with 'The Armstrong Line'.

Booda said...

To Anonymous. It was Joe that claimed to have surpassed the speed of sound. His colleagues on the ground disputed it. Joe may have been wrong, hey may later have realised, but I'm pretty sure he was adamant that he did indeed break the sound barrier despite what instruments on the ground recorded. I'm with Joe on that one.

Anonymous said...

At 102,800 ft, reaching a peak velocity of 614 mph... You would say he did not break the sound barrier? You posit that the air pressure that changed how he fell, reaching a terminal velocity almost six times what it would be at the earth's surface, has no effect on the velocity in which sound would travel, but in fact the speed of sound is a constant?


He exceeded the speed of sound.